Monthly Archives: February 2007

He Got It!

Over the past year or so, I have been collecting dental supplies to send out to the dental clinic at Karawa Hospital.  I even had a donation of dental extraction forceps from my dental supply company (Henry Schein Ash Arcona) through the guy we deal with all the time and his boss.  Shipping things out to the Congo is no easy matter.  It is risky to ship by any means and very expensive.  So getting connected with an old time Congoite ex-missionary (if one can be called an ex-missionary and still be so involved in missions) was an answer to prayer.  Shelon is Canadian, no less, works with Health Partners International and so that simplifies the whole shipping process.  He has found that the easiest and least expensive way to get valuable supplies out there is to make a trip out himself and hand deliver the stuff.  He takes little baggage of his own and ships many trunks as excess accompanied baggage.  So those time dated medications don’t outdate and he knows they get there. 

He made a trip out in Jan.  he is back and sent me this picture.

Songo, one of the men I trained, has received the trunk I sent. 

A picture is really worth a thousand words.

Sheldon plans another trip in May.  This time I can send some materials that I couldn’t send in winter for fear of them freezing.  Must buy another trunk.  Must order local anesthetic and some filling supplies. 

Anyone want to help, contact me.

Advertisements

Comments Off on He Got It!

Filed under Dental

And we are supported by?

Tomorrow sometime, the designer of our kitchen is coming by to make a wee hole in the ceiling of the hall closet.  We are in search of beams and such.  There has to be something holding up the two floors above the kitchen, we’re just not sure what or where. 

It would be nice to know before we remove something that would cause the building to come crumbling down. 

So here’s hoping we find a suspended beam up there somewhere or my kitchen dreams will remain just that – dreams.

Comments Off on And we are supported by?

Filed under Day to Day

Wild Dreams

Once Leo and I were lying in bed late on a Saturday morning.  He asked me if I would like him to make my wildest dreams come true.

“You mean we are going to remodel the kitchen!”  I replied. 

Not quite what he had in mind.  But here we are, only about 5 years later and we are going to do it!

Oops – I mean remodel the kitchen. 

This morning our preferred cabinet maker/designer dropped his proposed design off at my office.  I like it.  This is exciting.  I really want to get started NOW.

Comments Off on Wild Dreams

Filed under Day to Day

The joy of friends

There is a good feeling that comes from entertaining friends. 

Today, we were in the middle of measurements for the new (hopefully) kitchen.  Sara is getting ready for grad pictures – that means hair.  For her this is a major issue and for any black girl with short, short hair who would like to have long flowing locks for grad, a major part of the preparations.  So a friend offered to do it for her.  This will save Sara a huge chunk of money and she will get what she wants.  These friends of ours live in Wakaw but needing to do some shopping, they drove the hour up here. 

They took off to get their shopping done, we had some things to do and we were all going to get together again around 4 pm. 

Leo and I had one of those rare Saturday afternoon coffee dates.  That was a lot of fun.  We took Zaka with us and he enjoyed one of Aunt Annie’s apple turnovers at the Bison. 

Made it home by 4 and no friends showed up.  At about 6 I began to put supper on the table and they drove up.  Ok – will my dish of cabbage rolls and perogies stretch to feed them – yeah, I think.  And I have bread.  We talk them into staying and lo and behold – in walk Eric, Michelle and Patrick.  Christian showed up a bit earlier in the day.  Now we will be eleven for supper instead of three.  So I pulled out some left over rice and curry leftovers and cut the bread.  It stretched just the right amount and we all had plenty.

It is good to have friends that are friends enough to do this kind of impromptu, no fuss kind of entertaining. 

Comments Off on The joy of friends

Filed under Day to Day

Reposted

Still having problems with split posts.  I have reposted the last two in just one part, so if you were wondering what I was talking about you can now read them in their entirety.

 

Comments Off on Reposted

Filed under Dealing with stuff

Snowing

Woke up this morning to news about the incredible snowfall in England.  So I popped over to Toni’s blog to see what he had to say. 

AHH.  He has pictures.

He rode his bike!!!  Broke the chain a few times.  Still that may have been easier than driving by the looks of the roads on the news.

Just as snow is unusual for England, we would be in a bad situation if we didn’t get it here.  It would mean something was seriously wrong in our climate world and we would fear for the dryness of the summer.

Then the news again catches my ear – one and a half meters of snow in New York State.  That would take some diffing to get out of.  I would definately stay home.  Of course I have a four wheel drive and I might be tempted to do something stupid like try.

Comments Off on Snowing

Filed under In the News

Women and Spirituality 2

I guess that when one publishes something as part 1 there is an obligation to continue on to part 2, and so on.  I am not sure how many “and so ons” there will be but here goes part 2.

 

The quote I ended with in my first post on this, if taken on its own, may come across as rather arrogant and belligerent.  I don’t think that it was made in that frame of mind – that is my understanding from reading Sr. Joan Chittister’s book, Called to Question, and some of her other writings. 

 

The statement is forceful but one that both women and men need to understand.  I believe it is a statement about the worth of the person, regardless of gender.  And I believe that God calls us to the sort of wholeness that does not allow us to use others or to be used by others in ways that diminish our real value as bearers of his image.  

 

 believe that my highest calling in life is to serve God.  I don’t think that this is any different for males or females.  In this we are equal before God and equally created in God’s image.  That said, I also believe that God calls us as individuals to a whole assortment of tasks to carry out the work of his kingdom and requires us to be faithful to our calling.  I believe that the calling of God on our lives supersedes any limitation our culture wishes to place on us due to gender, race or social standing. 

 

Sr. Joan states this as, “I was not born to wash a man’s socks.  He was not born to make my decisions.”  I also do not believe that the highest calling of a woman is to serve men in these ways.

 

I think that we see this played out in the story of Jesus’ visit to the home of Mary and Martha.  Martha is doing exactly what her culture demands of a good woman.  She is rushing around in the kitchen getting together a meal and criticizes Mary for not living up to meeting those same expectations.  A woman in that culture should not be sitting at the Teacher’s feet listening while there is work to be done in the kitchen.  Jesus states that Mary, by choosing to be a disciple, to listen and learn at his feet, has chosen the better way.  She wasn’t following the cultural norms, but then Jesus lets us know on numerous occasions that his ways are counter-cultural.

 

In much the same way as Martha I think the church culture expects women to behave in certain ways in order to be classed as “Godly women.”    I know they do this because they do not want to misinterpret  the laws they see set down throughout history, interpreting the patriarchal systems as orders set in place by God rather than a broken order set in place by our sinful nature. 

 

When people hear women say that they were not created to “wash a man’s socks” care needs to be taken to listen carefully.  I believe that one can say that and still wash the socks without worrying that one is giving up some sort of status as an individual of value. 

In our house we both “wash the socks” , we serve each other in order to make our household run.  We have specific tasks that one of us will do better than the other.  They do not always fit the gender stereotypes.

 

Choosing to serve another freely out of a sense of responsibility, out of love and concern, is to serve as Christ taught us.  And regardless of our gender, we will only be truly happy when we do this and allow each other the freedom to respond to the work God calls us to without throwing up gender barriers.

  

 

I guess that when one publishes something as part 1 there is an obligation to continue on to part 2, and so on.  I am not sure how many “and so ons” there will be but here goes part 2.

 

The quote I ended with in my first post on this, if taken on its own, may come across as rather arrogant and belligerent.  I don’t think that it was made in that frame of mind – that is my understanding from reading Sr. Joan Chittister’s book, Called to Question, and some of her other writings. 

 

The statement is forceful but one that both women and men need to understand.  I believe it is a statement about the worth of the person, regardless of gender.  And I believe that God calls us to the sort of wholeness that does not allow us to use others or to be used by others in ways that diminish our real value as bearers of his image.    

 

I believe that my highest calling in life is to serve God.  I don’t think that this is any different for males or females.  In this we are equal before God and equally created in God’s image.  That said, I also believe that God calls us as individuals to a whole assortment of tasks to carry out the work of his kingdom and requires us to be faithful to our calling.  I believe that the calling of God on our lives supersedes any limitation our culture wishes to place on us due to gender, race or social standing. 

 

Sr. Joan states this as, “I was not born to wash a man’s socks.  He was not born to make my decisions.”  I also do not believe that the highest calling of a woman is to serve men in these ways.

 

I think that we see this played out in the story of Jesus’ visit to the home of Mary and Martha.  Martha is doing exactly what her culture demands of a good woman.  She is rushing around in the kitchen getting together a meal and criticizes Mary for not living up to meeting those same expectations.  A woman in that culture should not be sitting at the Teacher’s feet listening while there is work to be done in the kitchen.  Jesus states that Mary, by choosing to be a disciple, to listen and learn at his feet, has chosen the better way.  She wasn’t following the cultural norms, but then Jesus lets us know on numerous occasions that his ways are counter-cultural.

 

In much the same way as Martha I think the church culture expects women to behave in certain ways in order to be classed as “Godly women.”    I know they do this because they do not want to misinterpret  the laws they see set down throughout history, interpreting the patriarchal systems as orders set in place by God rather than a broken order set in place by our sinful nature. 

 

When people hear women say that they were not created to “wash a man’s socks” care needs to be taken to listen carefully.  I believe that one can say that and still wash the socks without worrying that one is giving up some sort of status as an individual of value. 

In our house we both “wash the socks” , we serve each other in order to make our household run.  We have specific tasks that one of us will do better than the other.  They do not always fit the gender stereotypes.

 

Choosing to serve another freely out of a sense of responsibility, out of love and concern, is to serve as Christ taught us.  And regardless of our gender, we will only be truly happy when we do this and allow each other the freedom to respond to the work God calls us to without throwing up gender barriers.

Comments Off on Women and Spirituality 2

Filed under Dealing with stuff